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Twitter Will Tone Down Porn Content on its Network

Twitter will take on the nudity content problem that it has since quite some time now. This issue cost the microblogging company a withdraw of a marketing campaign Nielsen was conducting on its network. Outrage occured when some users pointed out promoted tweets from Neilsen, a global consumer information company, were showing up on sexually explicit account page.

Twitter seems to try to have a balance between being able to deliver a family-safe experience and a stance that doesn’t alienate people running racy profiles like ”Homemade Porn” and ”Daily Dick Pictures”. These two accounts actually are the ones that many media outlets brought attention to before the halt of Neilson Promoted Tweets campaign occured.

Through different algorithms, Twitter can weed out inappropriate content and prevent it to show up beside promoted tweets. It can also ward off paid-for tweets campaign to appear on profiles that run that type of content.

As most Twitter users know, media containing nudity or even sexually explicit content can be posted on Twitter without too much hassle. Twitter is kind of standing on a blurred line when it comes to the do’s and don’ts of Twitterland. While the company doesn’t encourage the posting of nudity, it gives a lot of moving space on what you can or cannot post on Twitter.

According to Twitter’s terms of service, the Californian enterprise doesn’t mediate content and ask for users’ common sense. While Twitter isn’t scrutinizing every single post, it reviews tweets that have been flagged by the community.

Twitter specifically adresses the nudity issue along violent and other innapropriate content by asking users to turn on the ‘sensitive content warning label’ option, a setting that forces viewers to click a validate button to display the said content.

The only stuff that seems prohibited on Twitter is content that violates laws. While this policy is positive for user growth and activity numbers, it can backfire when corporations like Neilsen freaks out and just cancel the whole thing.

While many yelled scandal! at Twitter, the problem is more common that one could think. Google Adsense and other advertisement banner providers have to work hard to root out websites from their programs that violate content guidelines. The Internet is a big place and monitoring every glitches and properties that slid through the net is a challenging task.

While Twitter must work hard to make sure the Neilson case is not being repeated for its own sake, the problem could be less damaging than what observers and investors think. The advertisement and promoted tweets Twitter display on its network are based on keywords, topics of interest, informations on who you interacted with and many other data. Thus, many users that get served advertisement on Twitter don’t bother seeing it alongside racy content since it’s part of their habits.

Nevertheless, Twitter said it will attack the angle based on user behavior instead of specific tweets. The platform is determined to correctly identify pornographic accounts and will eventually disable them. This could affect negatively Twitter’s numbers, something investors don’t like at all, but the popular brand must tackle this to avoid further complications.

No wonder Facebook has a tolerance zero on racy content: having a loose policy about nudity like Twitter could lead over time to a further spreading of pornographic content, something most specialists would consider a loss of value for a web property not focused on porn.

The main thing about pornography is that it doesn’t go along with anything else published on Internet. It is a problem specific to pornography and a aspect that makes porn what it is in essence, something reserved for adults.

Some journalistic investigations found out that 1 out of every 1000 tweets is adult content, while about 10 million accounts would be dedicated to posting pornography. It is not the first time this problem has surfaced, as observers claimed in 2013 that Vine, the 6 seconds clip app owned by Twitter, had indeed a porn problem as well. #Twitter

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